Zodiac Discussion Forum

Did the Zodiac case…
 
Notifications
Clear all

Did the Zodiac case inspire this scene from Training Day?

6 Posts
3 Users
0 Likes
652 Views
doranchak
(@doranchak)
Posts: 2614
Member Admin
Topic starter
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZB88RISc6U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZB88RISc6U

http://zodiackillerciphers.com

 
Posted : March 14, 2021 4:27 pm
Richard Grinell
(@richard-grinell)
Posts: 717
Prominent Member
 

Training Day was 2001. Randall Scott Clemons was searching for a link between "slaves in the afterlife" and the Zodiac Killer, from the perspective of where this phrase originated in his mind, prior to putting pen the paper. In other words, the Zodiac Killer didn’t just pluck this phrase out of thin air – his interaction within society shaped him as a person and possibly influenced his propensity to adopt this form of language within his communications. Randall Scott Clemons then found an extremely interesting book entitled Parental Discretion is Advised; The Rise of N.W.A and the Dawn of Gangsta Rap featuring a section on the brutal beating of Rodney King on March 3rd 1991 by Los Angeles Police Department officers, sparking riots in 1992 after the acquittal of three of the four defendants. The book made reference to phrases used by LAPD officers via computer transmissions in their patrol cars.

Here is an extract from the book:
"Racial bias was rampant in the department, with an LAPD survey agreeing that prejudice on the part of officers towards citizens contributed to a negative interaction between police and the community, and that bias often led to use of excessive force. The report also showed how often incidents involving racial slurs from white officers against minority colleagues were frequently ignored. The culture of racism was so prevalent, officers were comfortable enough typing disparaging messages on computer transmissions between squad cars: "If you encounter these negroes, shoot first and ask questions later". "Sounds like monkey-slapping time". I’m back over here in the projects, pissing off the natives". "Everybody you kill in the line of duty becomes a slave in the afterlife".

Sorry about posting these derogatory terms, but it’s evident that the last statement about slaves in the afterlife long predated their use in 1991. Probably well back into the relevant period of the Zodiac Killer. Training Day likely gleaned the phrase from the Rodney King affair – after all – the film does feature a Los Angeles narcotics officer and detective.

https://www.zodiacciphers.com/

“I simply cannot accept that there are, on every story, two equal and logical sides to an argument.” Edward R. Murrow.

 
Posted : March 14, 2021 5:11 pm
doranchak
(@doranchak)
Posts: 2614
Member Admin
Topic starter
 

Thanks for that great background info, Richard. That context goes a long way to explain the Training Day reference.

http://zodiackillerciphers.com

 
Posted : March 14, 2021 11:28 pm
CuriousCat
(@curiouscat)
Posts: 1328
Noble Member
 

Thanks for that great background info, Richard. That context goes a long way to explain the Training Day reference.

Yes, thanks Richard and it does explain the connection to the movie, but now I wonder why that cop would say such a thing. I’d like to know who that cop was, where he got the saying from. It’s long been thought Zodiac could have been a cop, so….

 
Posted : March 15, 2021 12:44 am
Richard Grinell
(@richard-grinell)
Posts: 717
Prominent Member
 

Thanks for that great background info, Richard. That context goes a long way to explain the Training Day reference.

Yes, thanks Richard and it does explain the connection to the movie, but now I wonder why that cop would say such a thing. I’d like to know who that cop was, where he got the saying from. It’s long been thought Zodiac could have been a cop, so….

That is the big question Curious Cat, how far can we go back to find this derogatory language used by police, whether the LAPD or other police forces. I highly doubt it began the week before the Rodney King beating, so finding its origin within the police, drives to the heart of the question of whether the Zodiac Killer was in any way connected to the police, even for a short period of time.

https://www.zodiacciphers.com/

“I simply cannot accept that there are, on every story, two equal and logical sides to an argument.” Edward R. Murrow.

 
Posted : March 15, 2021 2:16 am
CuriousCat
(@curiouscat)
Posts: 1328
Noble Member
 

Thanks for that great background info, Richard. That context goes a long way to explain the Training Day reference.

Yes, thanks Richard and it does explain the connection to the movie, but now I wonder why that cop would say such a thing. I’d like to know who that cop was, where he got the saying from. It’s long been thought Zodiac could have been a cop, so….

That is the big question Curious Cat, how far can we go back to find this derogatory language used by police, whether the LAPD or other police forces. I highly doubt it began the week before the Rodney King beating, so finding its origin within the police, drives to the heart of the question of whether the Zodiac Killer was in any way connected to the police, even for a short period of time.

Well, the only language I am curious about here is the "slaves in the afterlife". Was that something common among LAPD? Sounds to me like something said by one person and that one person alone. If that comes from a computer transmission, there might still be a record of it, and who sent it.

 
Posted : March 15, 2021 3:52 am
Share: