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POI using term "Happy Christmass" and other rare Z wordings

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(@theforeigner)
Posts: 821
Prominent Member
Topic starter
 

I recently found that my POI indeed used the term "Happy Christmas" (not with the double s in the ending though)

So those of you of US origin and/or linguists ; HOW rare is it for a US born person to use that term? HOW significant is such a find?

Additionally my POI used several of the other rare wordings/terms that Zodiac used in his letters.

I have them on another computer, but will find them tomorrow and post them as well.

Hi, english is not my first language so please bear with me :)

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 6:09 am
xEnigm4x
(@xenigm4x)
Posts: 143
Estimable Member
 

In my experience, most people use Merry Christmas, but I have known people to use Happy Christmas before. I wouldn’t say it’s extremely rare, but definitely rare.

HMPF PF HMZ ΦXℲPGƎ FԀZG/POR!

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 6:45 am
Zamantha
(@zamantha)
Posts: 1588
Member Moderator
 

It’s Rare in my opinion.
Kudos, good find!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
If Zodiac ever joined a Z forum, I’m sure he would have been banned for not following forum rules. Zam’s/Quote
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
MODERATOR

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 6:53 am
(@emann)
Posts: 60
Trusted Member
 

In my neck of the woods it’s customary to hear "Merry Christmas" or perhaps an occasional "Happy Holidays". I don’t recall every hearing "Happy Christmas". My experience would say it’s an extremely rare term, but the USA is a big place and customs vary.

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 8:52 am
murray
(@murray)
Posts: 262
Reputable Member
 

I use the expression "happy Christmas" — but I find that I am alone in doing so, and it usually garners odd looks from friends and co-workers. My parents are from Minnesota — my mother’s family is from Finland. I was born and raised in the U.S. and I don’t recall hearing it used in Colorado, Arizona, Minnesota or California (all states I’ve called home.)

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 10:01 am
Tahoe27
(@tahoe27)
Posts: 5315
Member Moderator
 

Last Christmas (at Raley’s my local grocery store) there were Christmas cards that read "Happy Christmas" on the front.

I laughed and wish now I would have bought them. Isn’t common, but people do say it on occasion. Might be something Zodiac heard in his family growing up.

:o


…they may be dealing with one or more ersatz Zodiacs–other psychotics eager to get into the act, or perhaps even other murderers eager to lay their crimes at the real Zodiac’s doorstep. L.A. Times, 1969

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 10:16 am
Seagull
(@seagull)
Posts: 2309
Member Moderator
 

It isn’t as common as in the US as Merry Christmas but as you know it is common in the UK. Music from the UK was quite popular at that time though, and there was a general influence by the Brits. John Lennon and Yoko Ono hired billboards in 12 major cities around the world in December 1969 as a protest to the Vietnam war. Those billboards said "The War is over….if you want it! Happy Christmas John and Yoko". Naturally it made the news. They later released a song titled "Happy Xmas".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Xmas_(War_Is_Over )

I don’t have a clue if this is something that would have influenced Zodiac.

www.santarosahitchhikermurders.com

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 11:09 am
glurk
(@glurk)
Posts: 756
Prominent Member
 

Speaking for myself, I might very well tell someone "Jolly Birthday," or "Happy Christmas," or "Merry Hanukkah."
But I’m weird like that, and have an odd sense of humor, and always like to shake up people’s preconceptions and make them think…

-glurk

——————————–
I don’t believe in monsters.

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 11:20 am
Tahoe27
(@tahoe27)
Posts: 5315
Member Moderator
 

Speaking for myself, I might very well tell someone "Jolly Birthday," or "Happy Christmas," or "Merry Hanukkah."
But I’m weird like that, and have an odd sense of humor, and always like to shake up people’s preconceptions and make them think…

-glurk

Me too. For you glurk… ;) :lol:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9K796cnJ5o


…they may be dealing with one or more ersatz Zodiacs–other psychotics eager to get into the act, or perhaps even other murderers eager to lay their crimes at the real Zodiac’s doorstep. L.A. Times, 1969

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 11:52 am
traveller1st
(@traveller1st)
Posts: 3583
Member Moderator
 

Just as an on topic reminder. Zodiac mixed his terms on that occasion.

Mery Xmass & New Year (Envelope)
Happy Christmass (Letter)

Just for even more clarity/confusion. :)


I don’t know Chief, he’s very smart or very dumb.

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 1:08 pm
vasa croe
(@vasa-croe)
Posts: 493
Honorable Member
 

I always write Merry Christmas, but I say both Happy and Merry Christmas at times. In writing, there is more thought put into it, and I guess traditionally in the US it is Merry Christmas which is why I write it that way.

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 5:00 pm
(@theforeigner)
Posts: 821
Prominent Member
Topic starter
 

Thank you all for your input, I appreciate it :)

But still don’t know if I should consider my finding significant or not :?

My finding was my POI using the term in writing, and as far as I know his connection to the british is limited to some kind of bizz now and then.

Hi, english is not my first language so please bear with me :)

 
Posted : March 18, 2015 8:08 pm
vasa croe
(@vasa-croe)
Posts: 493
Honorable Member
 

I would say writing it is more odd than saying it, at least in the US.

 
Posted : March 19, 2015 6:00 pm
Jarlve
(@jarlve)
Posts: 2547
Famed Member
 

In my experience, most people use Merry Christmas, but I have known people to use Happy Christmas before. I wouldn’t say it’s extremely rare, but definitely rare.

Google search for "merry christmas": 81.900.000 results.
Google search for "merry christmass": 271.000 results.

So for what it is worth, 0.329% of the time, people use "merry christmass" instead of "merry christmas". It’s more uncommon that it is rare.

AZdecrypt

 
Posted : May 1, 2016 6:51 pm
(@dag-maclugh)
Posts: 794
Prominent Member
 

My POI’s mother was born in South Africa, which was an English possession for some time.

 
Posted : May 1, 2016 7:51 pm
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